Ottawa Functional Medicine – Dominick Hussey – Centretown and North Gower
functional medicine vs integrative medicine: what is the difference?

Ottawa Functional Medicine Vs Integrative Medicine: What Is The Difference?

Are you curious about the difference between Ottawa functional vs integrative medicine?

If so, you are in the right place.

Today I am going to talk about Ottawa functional medicine vs integrative medicine.

More importantly.

By the end of this article, you should be able to decide which approach is right for you.

Let’s jump straight in and compare the different philosophies of functional and integrative medicine.

1. Philosophies

Functional medicine as defined by the Institute of Functional Medicine is,

“a personalized, systems-oriented model that empowers patients and practitioners to achieve the highest expression of health by working in collaboration to address the underlying causes of disease.”

In other words, functional medicine looks to identify problem systems in the body and empowers the patient to resolve those problems.

Integrative Medicine as defined by the Weil Institute is,

“healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies.”

In other words, integrative medicine emphasizes a holistic science-based approach through a collaboration between the patient and practitioner.

From a philosophical standpoint, functional medicine vs integrative medicine is very similar.

Let’s see if this similarity continues by looking at how they treat patients in practice.

2. Ottawa Functional Medicine Vs Integrative Medicine: How Do They Treat Patients?

Functional practitioners strive to find the most natural way to treat their clients.

In Functional medicine, there is a strong emphasis on food and nutrition as medicine.

At the same time, just like integrative medicine, their approach is science-based.

Integrative medicine practitioners use a combination of medical and alternative treatment modalities to treat clients.

In integrative medicine, there is some emphasis on nutrition but practitioners also use specific complementary therapies.

Examples of these complementary therapies used by Ottawa integrative medicine practitioners include Chelation therapy and IV therapy.

In integrative medicine, there is more emphasis on the practitioner giving a treatment to the patient.

3. What Do They Treat?

Both Functional and Integrative medicine treats a wide variety of conditions.

The differences are seen between individual practitioners.

Some Ottawa Functional medicine practitioners specialise in Alzheimers Disease. While other functional practitioners have a more general practice.

On the other hand, Dr. Richard Nahas, an Integrative medicine doctor specialises in chronic pain.

4. Education

Most Ottawa Functional medicine practitioners have a non-medical training background. Some have training in Osteopathy while others have education in Naturopthic Medicine or Chiropractic.

In contrast, the majority of Integrative medicine practitioners in Ottawa are medically trained doctors.

5. Are They Covered On Insurance or OHIP?

Functional medicine services are not covered under either insurance or OHIP. The one exception is if you have a health spending account type insurance plan.

Some integrative medical services are covered under OHIP. You will usually need a referral from your family doctor.

Did I Miss Anything?

Are you drawn towards Functional medicine or Integrative medicine?

Are you still confused between functional medicine vs integrative medicine?

Either let me know by leaving a comment below.

Best Ottawa FunctIonal Medicine Practitioner - The Definitive Guide

The Best Ottawa Functional Medicine Practitioner – The Definitive Guide

Are you looking for the best Functional Medicine practitioner in Ottawa?

If so, you are in the right place.

Today I am going to tell you about the top Ottawa Functional Medicine practitioners.

Even better.

I will be highlighting the following key points about each practitioner, including:

  • Medical Training
  • Functional Medicine Training
  • What Conditions do they specialise?
  • Experience, Fees and Location

Let’s jump in.

Dr. Carri Drzyzga DC, ND.

Medical Training

Dr. Carri Drzyzga is a Doctor of Chiropractic and Naturopathic Medicine.

Functional Medicine Training

Dr. Drzyzga has completed the following training:

  • Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice with the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM)
  • The Kalish Method with The Kalish Institute
  • The Bredesen RECODE Program

Conditions

Dr. Carri specialises in the treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease and Fatigue.

Experience, Fees and Location

Dr. Drzyzga has been working as a Functional Medicine practitioner since 2005.

The cost of her initial Functional Medicine consultation is CAD 350.

Dr. Carri office is located at 2543 St Joseph Blvd, Orléans, ON K1C 1G2

Dominick Hussey

Medical Training

Dominick Hussey is a UK trained Naturopath and Osteopathic Manual Practioner

Functional Medicine Training

Dominick has completed the Applying Functional Medicine iin Clinical Practice course with the Institute of Functional Medicine.

Conditions

Dominick has a general practice and has a special interest in the treatment of chronic pain and IBS.

Experience, Fees and Location

Dominick has been practising as a Functional Medicine practitioner since 2014.

The cost of an initial Functional Medicine consultation is CAD 200.

Dominick practises from Ottawa Holistic Wellness in Centretown and North Gower.

Dr. Nathalie Beauchamp, DC

Medical Training

Dr. Nathalie Beauchamp is a Doctor of Chiropractic.

Functional Medicine Training

Dr. Beauchamp is a registered Certified Functional Medicine Practitioner with the IFM.

Conditions

Dr. Beauchamp specialises in Chiropractic care, health coaching and lifestyle medicine.

Experience, Fees and Location

Dr. Beauchamp has been a practising chiropractor since 1998.

Dr. Beauchamp does not offer a Functional medicine consultation.

Dr. Beauchamp works from Sante Chiropractic clinic in Orleans.

Dr. Adrienne Junek, MD, CCFP, ABOIM

Medical Training

Dr. Junek is a medically trained Doctor and has completed a fellowship in integrative medicine through the University of Arizona and am American Board certified in integrative medicine (ABOIM, 2017).

Functional Medicine Training

Dr Junek has completed the following courses with the IFM:

  • Applying Functional Medicine in Clinical Practice
  • Biotransformation (formerly Detox) Advanced Practice Module
  • Cardiometabolic Advanced Practice Module
  • Energy Advanced Practice Module
  • GI Advanced Practice Module
  • Hormone Advanced Practice Module
  • Immune Advanced Practice Module

Conditions

Dr. Junek has a general practice and clients are normally referred to her via their Family practitioner.

Experience, Fees and Location

Dr. Junek has been practising as a Functional Medicine practitioner since 2017.

Her services are covered by OHIP for Ontario residents.

She practises from the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Center.

Did I Miss Anything

Which Functional Medicine practitioner are you going to see?

Have I missed any practitioners?

Either way, let me know by leaving a comment below.

4 Strategies To Help Histamine Related Menstrual Headaches

Many of my clients report headaches that correlate with their menstrual cycle. These clients assume that their headaches are an indication of an underlying hormonal problem. This conclusion is logical and possible, but another common underlying cause is histamine intolerance.

I recently had a client say to me. “I have been getting headaches.” “Do the headaches correlate to any foods you are eating”, I replied. ” No,” she said. “But they do appear to relate to my menstrual cycle.” “In particular, they occur on day 13 of my cycle and occasionally a few days before my period begins.

Interestingly, the timing of the headaches coincides with two peaks of estrogen in the menstrual cycle.

The first peak is the highest and occurs towards the end of ovulation. The second peak occurs a few days before the start of menstruation.

Estrogen decreases the levels of Diamine Oxidase (DAO) the body. DAO is one of the main enzymes in the body that breaks down histamine.

Histamine is a compound that the body produces in the presence of allergens and gut and systemic infections such as Lyme disease.

Chronic or longstanding infections will lead to a buildup of histamine in the body. An excessive accumulation of histamine will lead to symptoms such as headaches.

Therefore if you have an underlying infection with a related high level of histamine, a peak in estrogen and an associated drop in DAO will lead to a spike in histamine.

If you think that you suffer from histamine related menstrual headaches, the following strategies may help.

Strategies to help lower histamine related menstrual headaches

For tackling histamine related menstrual headaches, there are two categories of treatment: symptom-reducing and root cause resolution.

Symptom-reducing

1. Take a Diamine Oxidase (DAO) supplement

If you get histamine related menstrual headaches, try taking a DAO supplement a day or two before you expect your symptoms. I recommend Seeking Health Histamine Block.

2. Avoid high histamine foods

High histamine foods include fermented vegetables and dairy, processed meats and food additives. Avoiding high histamine foods a few days before and during the days you expect your headaches to occur may help reduce symptoms.

3. Take Vitamin C and Quercetin

Quercetin and Vitamin C both help to lower histamine in the body. Taking both nutrients a few days before and during days that you expect your symptoms may improve. I suggest taking Design for Health Stellar C, which contains both Quercetin and Vitamin C.

Root cause resolution

As we discussed above, the body produces histamine in the presence of allergens and infections such as gut infections and Lyme disease. Chronic or longstanding infections will lead to a buildup of histamine. Functional medicine practitioners can help identify and treat underlying infections. Gut infections that can cause excess histamine include Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) and parasites.

Disclaimer

This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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